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CAAi unveils new International Air Law blended-learning training course

Posted 25 October 2016 · Add Comment

CAA International (CAAi), part of the UK CAA International Directorate, has launched a brand new training course, designed to support aviation managers across the industry with a solid grounding in international aviation law.

This course explores the international conventions and agreements that govern civil aviation and keep us safe and examines how these international laws affect your everyday work.

Developed by senior UK CAA legal experts and e-Learning technology specialists LEO Learning, the course uses a blend of both online distance learning and a one-day interactive classroom session. The online modules feature a mix of high-impact images, diagrams, audio clips, animations, infographics and videos, designed to create maximum impact and user engagement. The course takes delegates on a passenger journey; from buying an airline ticket, to being at the airport all the way to arriving at the final destination. The course explores how international air law affects all areas of aviation from the perspective of a paying passenger.

In the classroom, delegates have the opportunity to apply their distance learning with a UK CAA expert. Through group discussions of past experiences, case study reviews and general observations, delegates can delve deeper into how international laws affect different scenarios and situations, the key international conventions and how this affects the work you do every day.

Adrian Sayce, senior technical advisor for CAAi and former ICAO President for the Air Navigation Commission said: “This course integrates the different elements of law to create a coherent and clear presentation of air law. This is done by following a typical passenger journey and reviewing the associated legal aspects. This is quite a different approach to the traditional teaching of air law and it makes the air law course both interesting and relevant to anyone involved in aviation. The law underpins every aspect of aviation. Law is not something that only lawyers can deal with. It is important for everyone involved or affected by aviation, including professionals, consumers and those on the ground, because the law establishes individual legal responsibilities and defines legal entitlements if anything goes wrong.”

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