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ACI calls for immediate solution for the ban on on-board electronic devices

Posted 18 April 2017 · Add Comment

Airports Council International (ACI) World calls for immediate solution for the ban on electronic devices in the aircraft cabin.

Representing 1,940 airports worldwide, Airports Council International (ACI) World called for immediate relieve of the ban on electronic devices in the aircraft cabin with the attempts of TAV Airports President & CEO Sani Şener.

Following the meeting held in Doha, the capital city of Qatar, ACI Governing Board released a media bulletin and highlighted that alternative solutions such as additional security measures and the use of state-of-the-art technology for cabin baggage screening can solve the issue. The media released stated: "The ACI Governing Board failed to understand why proposals made by Istanbul Atatürk Airport have not been considered". 

TAV Airports President & CEO Sani Şener has been a member of the Governing Board of ACI World representing Europe continent since 2014. The United States and the United Kingdom has recently banned the electronic items larger than a mobile phone in the aircraft cabin for flights coming from selected airports including Istanbul Atatürk Airport.

Şener said that the ban had some commercial concerns and was an attempt to prevent the growth of Turkish Airlines (THY) and the airline companies operating at the Gulf region. Şener also mentioned that he would discuss the issue at ACI Governing Board meeting.

The statement of ACI Governing Board included: 

"The recent ban on electronic items in the aircraft cabin by the United States and the United Kingdom for flights coming from selected airports has again highlighted the challenges that the industry faces in the current security climate. Airports, along with industry partners and governments, put security as a top priority and understand the need to implement measures rapidly when a heightened threat level is identified. However, information sharing and coordination on security measures among governments and with the industry is also crucial to ensure effective security. In particular, inconsistency in the application of security measures does not lead to security effectiveness and may result in simply moving the threat to other locations rather than addressing it. In the present case, it also leads to passenger confusion and results in commercial distortions not just for airlines but also for airports.

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