in Technology

ACI calls for immediate solution for the ban on on-board electronic devices

Posted 18 April 2017 · Add Comment

Airports Council International (ACI) World calls for immediate solution for the ban on electronic devices in the aircraft cabin.

Representing 1,940 airports worldwide, Airports Council International (ACI) World called for immediate relieve of the ban on electronic devices in the aircraft cabin with the attempts of TAV Airports President & CEO Sani Şener.

Following the meeting held in Doha, the capital city of Qatar, ACI Governing Board released a media bulletin and highlighted that alternative solutions such as additional security measures and the use of state-of-the-art technology for cabin baggage screening can solve the issue. The media released stated: "The ACI Governing Board failed to understand why proposals made by Istanbul Atatürk Airport have not been considered". 

TAV Airports President & CEO Sani Şener has been a member of the Governing Board of ACI World representing Europe continent since 2014. The United States and the United Kingdom has recently banned the electronic items larger than a mobile phone in the aircraft cabin for flights coming from selected airports including Istanbul Atatürk Airport.

Şener said that the ban had some commercial concerns and was an attempt to prevent the growth of Turkish Airlines (THY) and the airline companies operating at the Gulf region. Şener also mentioned that he would discuss the issue at ACI Governing Board meeting.

The statement of ACI Governing Board included: 

"The recent ban on electronic items in the aircraft cabin by the United States and the United Kingdom for flights coming from selected airports has again highlighted the challenges that the industry faces in the current security climate. Airports, along with industry partners and governments, put security as a top priority and understand the need to implement measures rapidly when a heightened threat level is identified. However, information sharing and coordination on security measures among governments and with the industry is also crucial to ensure effective security. In particular, inconsistency in the application of security measures does not lead to security effectiveness and may result in simply moving the threat to other locations rather than addressing it. In the present case, it also leads to passenger confusion and results in commercial distortions not just for airlines but also for airports.

* required field

Post a comment

Other Stories
Advertisement
Latest News

National Aviation Services (NAS) partners with #VisaFreeAfrica

The Kigali Global Shapers has partnered with National Aviation Services for an exclusive sponsor of #VisaFreeAfrica (VFA), a global campaign to facilitate mobility in Africa.

The Range Rover of the skies

No fewer than five Pilatus PC-24 jets are already on order for operations in Africa – and the company has now stopped taking further orders until the first deliveries of the twin-engine aircraft start, expected to be the last quarter of

Air Serv responds to cholera outbreak in southern DRC

Air Serv has deployed an aircraft to the Kasai Province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in response to the cholera epidemic affecting the region.

Kenya Airways Limited advised on financial restructuring

Global law firm White & Case has advised Kenya Airways Limited on its US$2 billion financial restructuring.

Legacy of Ghav's pioneers of peace

For more than a decade, the Ghana Aviation Unit (GHAV) was deployed in Côte d'Ivoire as part of a UN peacekeeping force. Erwan de Cherisey looks at what was achieved and the legacy left by the unit as it finally went home earlier this year.

The A350-1000 is certified for airline service

Delivery of the first A350-1000 – the longest-fuselage version of Airbus' A350 XWB jetliner – is planned before year-end following the aircraft's Type Certification by the European and U.S. airworthiness authorities.

AfBAC Expo SK2017
See us at
AfBAC Expo BT2017Aviation Africa BT18418Global Aerospace BT28218